Children’s Literature

What We’re Reading

The Crows of Pearlblossom by Aldous Huxley

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I was surprised to find a children’s book by Audlous Huxley but he did write one for his niece Olivia as a Christmas gift in 1944. My girls enjoyed the story of Mr. and Mrs. Crow who protect their nest from the evil rattlesnake with the help of a wise old owl.

Brat Farrar by Josphine Tey

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I am enjoying this English mystery. Josphine Tey writes without pretense, so clear that it almost reads like a children’s story but with weightier subject matter. She is an excellent writer, said to be the greatest mystery writer of her time. I have not finished it so I couldn’t say just yet.

Mouse House by Rumer Godden

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Rumer Godden is one of my favorite writers! This little story book is charming and the illustrations are adorable. My girls just loved the story of the little mouse family and their home.

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Unschooling

    “Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire” W.B. Yeats.

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  My oldest is almost 6, the age of formal schooling, and suddenly charts, stickers, schedules, assignments, tests and deadlines are deemed necessary for learning. The more I think about school, the more I find myself leaning towards this idea of unschooling . . .

Tasha Tudor

“I enjoy doing housework, ironing, washing, cooking, dishwashing. Whenever I get one of those questionaires and they ask what is your profession, I always put down housewife. It’s an admirable profession, why apologize for it. You aren’t stupid because you’re a housewife. When you’re stirring the jam you can read Shakespeare. “

Tasha Tudor

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Milosz, Precision and Storybooks.

Preface

First, plain speech in the mother tongue.
Hearing it, you should be able to see
Apple trees, a river, the bend of a road,
As if in a flash of summer lightning.

And it should contain more than images.
It has been lured by singsong,
A daydream, melody. Defenseless,
It was bypassed by the sharp, dry world.

You often ask yourself why you feel shame
Whenever you look through a book of poetry.
As if the author, for reasons unclear to you,
Addressed the worse side of your nature,
Pushing aside thought, cheating thought.

Seasoned with jokes, clowning, satire,
Poetry still knows how to please.
Then its excellence is much admired.
But the grave combats where life is at stake
Are fought in prose. It was not always so.

And our regret has remained unconfessed.
Novels and essays serve but will not last.
One clear stanza can take more weight
Than a whole wagon of elaborate prose.

Czeslaw Milosz
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There is a lot going on within this poem-  I especially love the last stanza. The importance of precision seems to be a reoccurring theme of his and as a mother, who is preoccupied with diapers, children, laundry and storybooks, I began to relate this theme to Children’s Literature.
    Lack of precision irritates me and seems to be a problem in children’s story books. When I read to my children, some books just D-R-A-G on.  The reader shouldn’t be muttering to himself, “how much longer?”  A poem or story should move forward without being too wordy; Quick and crisp details carrying it forward. The reader should desire to read on.
I am guilty of abridging poorly written storybooks just to get it over with. When I find myself doing this, I look at the book and think, ‘why do I have this on my shelf?’ And if it doesn’t have excellent illustrations that stand on its own-out it goes.
At times, when I am pressed for time and don’t feel like reading a lengthy book, I get Beatrix Potter’s little tale, “The Story of the Fierce Bad Rabbit.” It’s very concise, minimalistic even and my children love it.
Another problem of children’s literature, which Tolkien touches on in some of his writings, is “sniggering” tones. But, of course, that’s another story entirely.