Month: September 2016

Clutter Kills

Despite its melodramatic title I  enjoyed this article, How Getting Rid of My Stuff Saved my Motherhood. This particular passage articulated a truth I already felt rather keenly:

Studies show a direct link between the amount of physical possessions in a house and the stress level of the female homeowner. One study done at UCLA found that the more stuff was in a woman’s house, the higher her level of stress hormones. This same study also found that women subconsciously relate how happy they are with their home-life and family to how they feel about their homes. So the more clutter and chaos in the home, the less happy the woman is with her family and her life.

Although my husband appreciates a tidy home, his stress levels don’t seem related to its tidiness as much as mine. His stresses are mostly related to his career. (This was also the case when we were first married and I was still working outside the home.)

 

Links

Some Links to Posts I thought were interesting:

Wifely Submission is Easy: Well,  the principle is simple.

Groundless Fears of Men About Their Daughters:  Ah, a subject my husband and I frequently revisit. We are not opposed to our daughters going to college but we do not take the matter lightly either.

Women and Morality  Women are not little, emotionally driven, amoral faeries that men must repel or appease in order to survive. Women can attain virtue- should attain virtue and like men will have to stand before God and face judgment. Women however, have different duties than men and seem to approach morality differently as well: “I would say not that women are amoral but that their morality is teleological (utilitarian) rather than deontological. . .  women do not generate their own morality internally, but rather, typically, adopt the morality of the crowd. The second point is that putting women in positions of religious authority is obviously liable to lead rapidly to the promotion of moral error. . . Incidentally, studies have shown a truly extraordinary correlation between a father’s religious practices and those his children eventually adopt, and very little correlation with the mother’s.”